UpperKey: Freeing you from work while providing a guaranteed rental income for Dublin apartments

UpperKey offers a premium management service backed by excellent rates of guaranteed rent Dublin apartment owners can hope to find. Our multi-lingual professional team are always at hand to support your visitors and attend to the needs of their stay.

Maximising your property’s potential and freeing up your valuable time, you’ll wonder why you didn’t ask us to step in years ago.

The only real problem we create for our clients is: ‘What on earth are you going to do with all that free time?’

Dublin: A culture of friendly faces, full pints and festivals by the bucket-load

Dublin offers an array of museums, attractions and entertainment.

Yet, at the heart of what really makes this city tick, are the easy-going, fun-fuelled people and the city’s colourful pub culture.

It’s no surprise to anyone whose first association to this city and its uber-friendly inhabitants is a pint of the ‘black stuff’—followed closely by sipping a few of the afore mentioned while enjoying a traditional song or two in one of the 1000 pubs of the city.

Year-round entertainment — but be prepared to wrap up in winter

There is a mass of history and culture within Dublin. From the beautiful buildings and stunning sights to the celebration of famous historical faces who made this colourful location their stomping ground (think: James Joyce, Oscar Wilde, Samuel Beckett and more).

In addition to the obvious, annual festivals create a constant draw for music, literature, food and theatre lovers alike.

With a unique event on the calendar every month of the year, there isn’t a wrong time to visit.

You’ll find Irish and international playwrights feature heavily at the more traditional Theatre Festival, as opposed to the Dublin Fringe where anything can happen—and just about anywhere with locations from the most sizable stages to smallest hotel spaces.

There’s the Horse Show, a photography festival, plus rock music and DJs at Longitude. You’ll find science and literature offerings as well a contingency of camped up craziness at the LGBTQ Pride in June.

Dublin offers everything from street performers to Halloween spectaculars, all year round.

It truly is a city with a charm of its own, and one you’ll struggle to forget.

Property investment in Dublin

Dublin has been a city on the up for quite some time. It has proved the fastest growing economy for 4 years in a row and is now considered the 3rd top location for property investment in Europe.

If you don’t already own a property in Dublin, now is an excellent time to consider acquiring a piece of the action.

After taking a beating during the property market collapse 10 years ago, the Dublin economy has seen a sustained and superb recovery. Unemployment is at a low of 5.3% with its GDP growth year after year.

It’s not only the economy that’s making waves. Dublin has a highly educated workforce, with technology and investment companies taking advantage of its political stability and healthy economy.

16 of the Top 20 tech firms have operations in Dublin. That includes Facebook, Google, LinkedIn, Amazon, Microsoft and Airbnb.

Ireland is booming, and Dublin is leading the charge. It’s outpacing all other European cities in economic growth, investment and education. Not only that but Dublin has featured ahead of Paris, New York and Tokyo for the highest quality of life—2 years in a row.

Renting an apartment in Dublin

Due to Dublin performing so well in all bounds of life, rental prices are ascending the scale too.

The average cost of renting a property in Dublin has risen above €2k. With high demand affecting price, it also presents the problem that there are even fewer available properties than there has been at any point during the past 10 years.

Little supply and much demand

In current market situations, to keep rental prices fixed where they are, there would need to be an introduction of around 1000 new rental properties built every week. At the moment, the market is achieving only half that number.

With that in mind, rents will keep rising, and all over Ireland, not just in Dublin.

The problems you will likely face searching for a rental property in Dublin are both price and availability. There is a continuing need for houses and apartments for first-time buyers, new and growing families and downsizing tenants.

The market has introduced increasing development of residential blocks to sell not merely to those first-time buyers and home seekers but also wholesale investors. These giant rental market opportunities are incredibly attractive to backers and investors.

To offer a true viewpoint into the development situation, it was announced in June 2019 that institutional investors had acquired over 55% of all the property investment transactions in Dublin the previous year.

It also dictates that landlords are becoming professionals in the market, rather than second-home owners investing in a supplementary income.

Ireland now needs an influx of varying sized residential properties for every purpose. What that tells us is, finding a home in Ireland (and Dublin) will be an even greater challenge than ever.

Property & Rental Values in Dublin

How much money do you need to buy an apartment in Dublin?

Given average apartment prices, buyers will need around £4.6k per square meter (€5.4k) to buy into Dublin’s property market.

The lowest-priced properties currently stand at just over £3.6k/m2 with the top end standing at almost £6k/m2. (€4.3k–€7k)

Typical rental prices in Dublin

A single bedroom apartment in the city centre offers an average rent of around £1.4k/month. (€1.6k)

The bottom end of the market offers one-bed apartments at £1.1k/month and top-end prices of around £1.7k/month. (€1.4k–€2k)

A three-bedroom apartment in the city centre will achieve an average rent of around £2.5k/month. (€2.9k)

At the time of writing, Dublin’s three-bed apartment rentals ranged from £2.1k to £3.4k per month. (€2.5k–€4k)

UpperKey works efficiently and effectively to provide great value, but also to maximise profit. By offering the generous guaranteed rent scheme Dublin apartment owners need, within current market prices, we’re confident that we’re the best you’ll find.

Dublin’s favourite ‘work, rest and play’ districts

Dublin is broken down into 24 different postal districts. The lower the number, the closer you will be to the city centre.

Historically, those situated north of the river Liffey—all of the odd-numbered postcodes—were considered homes for the working classes. These would be the cheaper, older apartments.

Alternatively, to the south of the river—the even-numbered districts—you’ll find more expensive houses built for the middle and upper classes.

The class distribution has survived for the most part. However, just to contradict, there are exceptions where great neighbourhoods have been established in the North and poorer areas in the South.

Getting from A to B in Dublin

Public transport can get a little pricey, so living in the city centre is often the preferred option for those who regularly want to take full advantage of all it offers.

Dublin 2 has better houses and nicer neighbourhoods. What comes with this, though, is plenty of demand. It’s difficult to find an apartment here, and even if you do, prices will be high.

Dublin 1 is far cheaper, in fact, one of the most affordable districts in the city, as the houses are old and small, and considered lower class.

Areas from Dublin 3 to 8 are a little further from the city centre and offer a bit of an escape from the most bustle and noise. Don’t panic though—there’s still plenty of opportunity for eating, drinking and, well, making Dublin styled merry.

There’s no lack of supermarkets for essentials, and you’re still not too far away from the throb of the centre, for whenever you need another hit.

Dublin 6 is popular with tourists and residents alike. Rathmines, Ranelagh and Rathgar offer something a little quieter and more pleasant as does Dublin 4 with Ballsbridge, Donnybrook and Sandymount—all picturesque Dublin towns and all a little more pricey.

Dublin 7 and 8 are worthy areas with a few exceptions. Smithfield offers newer sensibly priced buildings, or perhaps, and just as well placed in the market, Phibsboro or Four Courts.

In Dublin 8 you’ll find one of Dublin’s star locations—Portobello. Very neat, very clean, a stunning canal and bags of cool on every corner.

Where are the best places to live and stay in Dublin?

There’s always a lot going on in Dublin. Whether you’re here to work or play, finding somewhere to stay will be your first challenge.

Finding the right place to stay depends on why you’re visiting and what you’re hoping to see and do.

Dublin’s coolest communities for visitors

Rathmines

You can get to Rathmines on foot from the centre or via a short bus ride. Both Rathmines and its sister suburb, Ranelagh, are the areas the trendsetters are heading for in Dublin right now.

With a large contingency of hipster bars and cafes, health food stores, takeaways and cinema, advocate this neighbourhood as entirely self-sufficient.

Portobello

Close to the city on the south of the river, Portobello manages to mix city living with a quieter style of suburban life. Terraced houses are interspersed with specialist coffee shops and cafes.

Visitors and residents alike will enjoy a wealth of entertainment, eateries, gyms, bars, clubs and cinemas—all on their doorstep.

It’s a great home from home, however long your stay.

Smithfield

A small and hip neighbourhood north of the city. Smithfield has a large square that operates as a hub, drawing all towards the bars and contemporary cafes.

That said, this is Dublin; you’ll still find traditional pubs here and plenty of excuses to paint the town red (or green).

Smithfield feels like a miniature city within the city. There’s plenty of life here, yet still a touch less of the typical tourist bustle than the city centre heralds.

Stoneybatter

A smaller suburb at the north, and still only a short walk from the centre, Stoneybatter is full of old terraced-house charm. However, recent redevelopment has added more fashionable shops, restaurants and bars to lift the real estate value.

Anyone looking to kick back and take it easier will find plenty of hipster coffee shops, as well as cultural areas of interest and architecture to wander through. Stoneybatter also houses Pheonix Park on its doorstep. This is the biggest enclosed park in Europe—ideal for winding down and enjoying the wide-open spaces.

For young professionals looking for a place to live in Dublin

As discussed, Dublin’s employment community is pulling workers into some of the most hi-tech industries in the world. These forward-thinking and savvy professionals are vying for prime real estate—not just for somewhere to live and work but to bring up families and establish a future in this fascinating city.

Phibsborough

A top property hotspot—growing in desirability from year to year. Offering a diverse mix of old pubs and vintage outlets, matched with modern restaurants delivering outstanding food and exceptional service.

Drumcondra

Close enough to take full advantage of the public transport into employment rich areas of the city, Drumcondra also houses a bounty of good old Dublin pubs. It’s also home to Croke Park GAA Stadium, for those keen to develop a taste in Gaelic Athletics and traditional Irish pastimes.

Dundrum

Another neighbourhood sat handily on the Luas tramline, Dundrum houses not only Dublin’s first purpose-built shopping centre of the 1970s but also its largest, built in 2005. With this abundance of shopping, plenty of restaurants and a multiplex cinema, it’s unsurprising that the average age of Dundrum residents now sits between 16 and 34.

Tourist numbers for the city

There are over 5 million visitors to Dublin each year, spending around €2 million in the process.

While Ireland’s tourism sector is enjoying tremendous success and reaping more profit than ever, there is a cloud hanging overhead, adding an edge of worry to the industry as well as excitement.

The effect of Brexit

There has been considerable concern regarding how Brexit will affect tourism to Ireland and Dublin. How whichever system is eventually decided on will translate for the significant percentage of British visitors, and Dublin’s largest markets, travelling from the US and Canada.

Until the actual repercussions of the final agreements (if they ever happen) are known, life looks as healthy as ever for Dubliners employed in the industry, as do the vast profits garnered towards Ireland’s tax income.

How long do visitors stay in Dublin

The average length of a tourist stay in Ireland is around 6 or 7 nights. Almost half of those visitors were on holiday. A large percentage of those left were visiting family or friends.

That’s first-rate news for property owners filling properties with short-term business or holiday lets.

Maximising property investments with guaranteed rent in Dublin

By accessing the tools and services UpperKey bring to every apartment we manage, our clients stand to gain more from their Dublin investments than they’d ever hoped.

Our standard policy offers one of the most competitive guaranteed rent schemes in Dublin. Not only does this remove risk, it adds the certainty of income every investor hopes for.

Our guaranteed property rental schemes are working for apartment owners all over the Irish capital. Just read our testimonials to find out how they’re working out for apartment owners just like you.

The additional bonus experienced by our clients, is the amount of time they recover when passing the physical duties over to our team. Whether you choose to reinvest the time you’ll gain into additional business or investment practice, or whether you’d prefer to utilised it for more leisurely pursuits, that’s entirely up to you.

We’re confident that we’re the best choice of the guaranteed rent companies and agents in Dublin. We’ve proved it time and time again, for owners on either side of the Liffey.

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